52 – Mustard Seed School – Sacramento

Mustard Seed School

(916) 447-3626
mustardseed@sacloaves.org

Mustard Seed is a free, private school for children 3-15 years old which provides a safe, nurturing and structured environment, a positive learning experience, happy memories, survival resources of food, clothing and shelter referrals, medical and dental screenings, immunization updates, counseling for children and their parents, and assistance entering or reentering public schools.

Mustard Seed School was established in 1989 to help meet the needs of homeless children. Many school age children do not attend school because of their homelessness; some lack immunizations, birth certificates, or other documents, some are in transit, and almost all lack a support system. In spite of their situations these children are eager to learn and to be accepted.

Many homeless children are not enrolled in school because the places their families find to sleep are often not near a child’s school and the family only plans to be there a short time. Sometimes the school needs an address or updated immunizations which homeless families cannot provide.

From fifteen to thirty-five children may attend our school each day, and an average stay is just three to four weeks. Some children have been out of school for a long time and need help to go back. A major goal of the Program is to prepare and enroll homeless children into public schools, and preschool for younger children, when families have found housing stability. Since the school began, over 4500 individual children have participated in Mustard Seed.

 

51 – Michael J. Fox Foundation For Parkinson’s Research

Michael J. Fox Foundation For Parkinson’s Research

MICHAEL’S STORY

Michael J. Fox in Congress

Childhood

Michael J. Fox was born Michael Andrew Fox in 1961 to parents William and Phyllis in Edmonton, the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta. (He later adopted the “J” as an homage to legendary character actor Michael J. Pollard.) Fox, a self-described “Army brat,” moved several times during his childhood along with his parents, brother, and three sisters. The Foxes finally planted roots in Burnaby, British Columbia (a suburb of Vancouver), when William Fox retired from the Canadian Armed Forces in 1971.

Career

Like most Canadian kids, Fox loved hockey and dreamed of a career in the National Hockey League. In his teens, his interests expanded. He began experimenting with creative writing and art and played guitar in a succession of rock-and-roll garage bands before ultimately realizing his affinity for acting. Fox debuted as a professional actor at 15, co-starring in the sitcom Leo and Me on Canadian Broadcasting Corp. (CBC) with future Tony Award-winner Brent Carver. Over the next three years, he juggled local theater and TV work, and landed a few roles in American TV movies shooting in Canada. When he was 18, Fox moved to Los Angeles. He had a series of bit parts, including one in CBS’ short-lived (yet critically acclaimed) Alex Haley/Norman Lear series “Palmerstown USA” before winning the role of lovable conservative Alex P. Keaton on NBC’s enormously popular “Family Ties” (1982-89). During Fox’s seven years on “Ties,” he earned three Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe, making him one of the country’s most prominent young actors.

“Spin City” reunited Fox with Family Ties creator/executive producer Gary David Goldberg. Together with Bill Lawrence, Goldberg created the series expressly for Fox, establishing it as a joint venture of Dreamworks SKG, Goldberg’s UBU Productions, and Lottery Hill Entertainment (run by Fox and partner Nelle Fortenberry, now a member of the Board of Directors of The Michael J. Fox Foundation). Goldberg served as co-executive producer with Fox for Spin City’s first and second seasons, and Lawrence stepped in during the third. For the fourth seasons, Rosenthal and Cadiff shared duties with Fox.

In other television work, Fox starred in Woody Allen’s “Don’t Drink the Water” in 1994. He directed Teri Garr and Bruno Kirby in an episode of “Tales From the Crypt” and later directed an installment of the series “Brooklyn Bridge.”

Fox also had time during his busy TV work to become an international film star, appearing in over a dozen features showcasing his keen ability to shift between comedy and drama. These include the Back to the Future trilogy, The Hard Way , Doc Hollywood , The Secret of My Success , Bright Lights , Big City , Light of Day , Teen Wolf , Casualties of War , Life With Mikey , For Love or Money , The American President , Greedy , The Frighteners , and Mars Attacks!

Fox married his “Family Ties” co-star, actress Tracy Pollan, in 1988. Together they have four children. Inspired to find projects that his kids would enjoy, Fox has lent his voice to a variety of hit children’s films since the early 1990s. He began as Chance the dog in Disney’s Homeward Bound movies. In December 1999, he provided the voice of Stuart Little for the Sony feature of the same name, and in the summer of 2001 Fox’s voice was heard as that of the lead in Atlantis The Lost Empire , his first animated feature for The Walt Disney Co.

Living and working with Parkinson’s disease

Though he would not share the news with the public for another seven years, Fox was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson’s disease in 1991. Upon disclosing his condition in 1998, he committed himself to the campaign for increased Parkinson’s research. Fox announced his retirement from “Spin City” in January 2000, effective upon the completion of his fourth season and 100th episode. Expressing pride in the show, its talented cast, writers, and creative team, he explained that new priorities made this the right time to step away from the demands of a weekly series. Later that year he launched The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, which the New York Times has called “the most credible voice on Parkinson’s research in the world.” Today the largest nonprofit funder of Parkinson’s drug development in the world, the Foundation has galvanized the search for a cure for Parkinson’s disease, and Michael is widely admired for his tireless work as a patient advocate.

In 2012 Fox announced his intention to return to full-time acting. While the announcement may have upended public expectations, Fox had spoken publicly about finding a drug cocktail that helped him control the symptoms and side effects of his Parkinson’s disease well enough to play a character with PD. In 2013, he returned to primetime network TV as Mike Henry on NBC’s “The Michael J. Fox Show.” The show, which quickly gained nationwide attention, centers on a beloved newscaster and family man who returns to work following a diagnosis with Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s families and Michael J. Fox Foundation supporters united around the power of optimism demonstrated by Fox’s return, hosting more than 2,000 premiere night house parties around the country to celebrate the airing of the first episode.

Fox also continues to thrill fans in his multi-episode guest arc as Lewis Canning, a devious attorney who uses his tardive dyskinesia to his clients’ advantage, in the CBS hit drama “The Good Wife” starring Julianna Margulies. In 2011, he guest starred in “Larry versus Michael J. Fox,” the season eight finale of Larry David’s acclaimed HBO comedy “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” In spring 2009 he portrayed embittered, drug-addicted Dwight in Denis Leary’s hit FX Network drama “Rescue Me,” a role that earned him his fifth Emmy Award. His 2006 recurring guest role in the ABC legal drama “Boston Legal” was nominated for an Emmy, and he appeared as Dr. Kevin Casey in the then-NBC series “Scrubs” in 2004.

Fox is the recipient of several lifetime achievement awards for accomplishments in acting, including the 2011 Hoerzu Magazine Golden Camera Award and the 2010 National Association of Broadcasters Distinguished Service Award.

Offstage

Fox also is the bestselling author of three books, all with Hyperion: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Future , a compendium of wisdom for graduates, was published in April 2010. Always Looking Up: The Adventures of an Incurable Optimist , published in April 2009, debuted at number two on the New York Times bestseller list. It was accompanied by an ABC-TV prime time special that was nominated for an Emmy award for Outstanding Nonfiction Special; additionally, its audio recording by Fox won the 2010 Grammy award for Best Spoken Word Album, an honor for which all three books were nominated. His first book, the 2002 memoir Lucky Man , also was a New York Times and national bestseller.

Fox is the recipient of honorary degrees from The Karolinska Institute in Sweden, New York University, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and the University of British Columbia. He also has received numerous humanitarian awards for his work and was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2010.

Fox has spoken and written extensively about his predisposition to look at challenges, including his Parkinson’s disease, through a lens of optimism and humor. His message has always been one of gratitude for the support he has received from his fellow Parkinson’s patients, and hope and encouragement for every decision to take action — no matter how big or small — to help advance the pursuit of a cure.

 

50 – Cerebral Palsy Foundation

 

OUR MISSION

WE ARE TRANSFORMING LIVES FOR PEOPLE WITH CEREBRAL PALSY TODAY – THROUGH RESEARCH, INNOVATION AND COLLABORATION.

The Cerebral Palsy Foundation process is to find, define and address Moments of Impact – the times at which interventions and insights, if properly implemented, have the power to improve lives.

We then work to better understand what is needed to effect change and the best ways to implement it. We seek out the best thinkers in an area, and form collaborative networks to work together and bring about transformation. Finally, we share our work with others so it will have the greatest possible impact.

Our Collaborative Networks bring together many of the country’s most prestigious medical institutions, as well as innovative thinkers in diverse areas such as technology and media, in order to accelerate not only the development of critical advances, but also their delivery.

While our work of course includes important strides being made toward the eventual prevention of cerebral palsy and developmental disabilities, our focus is on the translational research, clinical application and knowledge transfer that can dramatically change lives today.

“While we look to the future and the incredible advances that await, let us never lift our gaze so high that it fails to see the enormous impact we can have today.”
-Richard Ellenson, CEO

49 – Autism Speaks

Autism Speaks

Mission Statement

Autism Speaks Walk is the world’s largest fundraising event to support the diverse needs of the autism community. This grassroots movement is powered by parents of children on the autism spectrum, generating funds that fuel innovative research and make connections to critical lifelong supports and services. Begin your fundraising today. Register at www.AutismSpeaks.org/Walk.

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48 – World WildLife Fund

World WildLife Fund

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About
Our planet faces many big conservation challenges. No one person or organization can tackle these challenges alone, but together we can. WWF-US
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Company Overview
For nearly 60 years, WWF has been protecting the future of nature.
The world’s leading conservation organization, WWF works in 100 countries and is supported by over 1 million members in the United States and six million globally. WWF’s unique way of working combines global reach with a foundation in science, and involves action and partnership at every level from local to global to ensure the delivery of innovative solutions that meet the needs of both people and nature.
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General Information
We encourage candid discussions on our Facebook page, but please be respectful! Any comments that are offensive, obscene or contain spam will be deleted.

WWF’s privacy policy: http://wwf.to/1zB7Wfq

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47 – Fire Relief Funds For Emily Wycoff & Family

EMILY WYCOFF AND FAMILY – CAMP FIRE VICTIMS

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This what happened, it only took 30 minutes or so and the home and everything in it was destroyed…

 

The following is a bit unsettling; proceed if you’re cool with that.
Emily L. Wycoff, ex-resident of 6215 Pentz Road, Paradise, CA 95969 USA. This fire began in the Pulga Gap in California just before Concow, and has since retained its title as the worst in California’s history.
[1] Getting Out
I was awoken at roughly 7:30am to a warning from my mother about an orange canopy overhead indicating one of many past fire threats; it was imperative that we gather our things and possibly leave the area for a while. Until this instance, none of these scares had actually forced us to leave for good. In the past, we would gather our most important belongings and live at a relative’s house for days or weeks. I started to gather and load my most precious belongings, leaving certain things which I could’ve brought but didn’t. I lost several clothes, drawings and paintings, a sewing machine, several instruments and electronics, various gifts, and jewelry. My mother’s boyfriend, Darren, became agitated that this danger was not being broadcast and that warnings were not being offered on television or online. I became nauseous and wet a washcloth, which I kept with me throughout the whole ordeal. Darren and I went outside several times to see a red sky growing rapidly darker until, within minutes, it was like night. We heard the first propane tank explode in the distance. “Armageddon,” he sighed. We began seeing fire and police vehicles lining the road with other cars and making noise. My mom instructed us to meet at Ace Hardware. I ran back inside and got the cat (he promptly jumped from the box, and so I simply placed him in my vehicle with his food, towel, and bowl in tow); Darren backed his own car up to our door. I told him I was leaving, and he said to head downhill. I began taking long, timed yoga breaths, and I found myself burping frequently, making sure I wasn’t about to vomit.
[2] On the Road
I found that a lot of cars were turning around just before the hospital not a quarter of a mile from my home, and I followed suit, looking up and down the road and to the gestures of other drivers for direction. The traffic was slow or halted until 2:00pm. We were in the midst of a thick cloud of smoke by the time I reached my house again, and after I passed it I started to see things alight, and I became more uneasy. I kept my head and frequently reassured my howling cat, but I’d never experienced anything of the sort before–my imagination and instincts ran together as I tried to predict how the situation could turn for the worst, and what I needed to do in the immediate following seconds depending on *every* element of my environment and the changes therein. There wasn’t a moment wherein I was not vigilant. From this moment I grappled for over two straight hours with the possibility that I might die a searing, painful death alongside my innocent cat, leaving loved ones behind. My mind leaped between the most appropriate moments to stay seated or hop vehicles, but it never came to the latter. Buildings and trees began to catch, and I could not see around me except for the flames of burning trees and structures–what would have registered as electrical lights at night were now columns of flame midday. I was afraid that I might be crushed or exposed by a tree, branch, or flying debris. I was afraid that I would be locked inside my car as the road melted underneath, or that my tires would get stuck to the road. I was afraid that my fear would force me to pass out, endangering us both. I was afraid that a wire would fall from above and electrocute my car. I was afraid a more desperate vehicle would damage mine to the point of immobility in its attempt to escape at the expense of others. I wished that I had sooner secured a way to end my life swiftly, as with a gun or fast-working anesthetic, but my next immediate option was ensuring my survival, as well as that of my cat.
I could not believe that I didn’t get “out.” Prior to this, I only knew of evacuations happening exclusively *before* fire consumed an area. Propane tanks were blowing all around us like gun shots, although I never witnessed any explosions directly. My head swims as I type this. Fences and bushes burned where I used to take long walks. I could feel their heat through my window, and so I turned the air conditioner on, circulating only inside-air, and making sure not to burn too much fuel, turning it up, down, or off as necessary. I continued to pat my face with the washcloth. I wove in and out of vehicles, allowing some to pass me and pulling over where police and fire trucks were required to pass us. Embers and sparks crossed the road and caught the piles of fallen pine needles aflame.
I did not pass anything quickly; the traffic trapped us on that long and narrow road with ditches that would strand a car as small as mine keeping us on the road. I cuddled up uncomfortably close to the other vehicles around me, and made an effort to inch forward so as to put out any sparks or embers that might have landed on or near my tires. I prayed–keeping in mind that people who pray still die in fires–that I would, despite my doubts, be allowed to enter the True Paradise with my Father in Heaven.
I continued to monitor my cat and everything around me with intense vigilance, reassuring him verbally (as well as for my own sake), and taking long, timed yoga breaths. There were several points at which he howled at the blazing buildings next to us, and I covered his eyes. Embers and charcoal fell from the sky, and the wind was nearly blowing sideways. I was later informed that one of the night-black sequences was due to a pillar of flames funneling within a cloud of black smoke and dumping a very large spot fire onto Pearson. These embers caused spot fires all over the area, and the rapid jet stream just above the trees sent them far ahead of the burning core.
I often used my wipers to clear anything I could from my windshield. Shrubs and grass caught next to us, and I made sure to stay close to the middle of the road, keeping in mind that the opening to my gas tank was on my driver’s side. Every one of us in vehicles watched the burning and felt its heat, passing lighted structures and vehicles as quickly as we could without being the one stuck right next to anything on fire lest our tires pop. I witnessed this several times down the road, one of the most terrible being the open ambulance bursting with flames of many colors, which I was also forced to pass slowly. Despite all of these precautions, I also recognized that my life was far from being in my own hands, and that, statistically, anything, at any point, could go horribly wrong. I pulled out my phone and recorded an I-love-you message in the case that it survived, and placed it underneath the seat where it was least likely to melt.
[3] Corner Store
I continually whispered words of comfort to my cat as we passed in and out of the night-like shadow several times. I told myself that I could not afford to worry about the people behind me, nor my family. I was stressed about not being able to make my phone interview, but I swallowed that, too. At this point I had been checking my phone several times for signal, trying at every instance to reassure my family that I had made it a few feet forward. A pair of young men were outside the church taking pictures of burnt structures. This calmed my panic to an extent. I was now following a smart little black Kia occupied by a mother and her two children to Tony’s corner store on Pentz and Bille where firefighters were stationed. Everything continued to burn less than a hundred feet away from us on either side of the road, but nothing immediately within range was alight. A tree whistled and crackled as its base began to combust; it sounded similar to a firework. I assured my cat, who was now fixated on the roaring building to my left, that it would burn itself out. We had come to a complete halt for the next two hours.
I frequently checked my mirrors for burning tires and on-road hazards. My mellower senses returned to me. My stomach growled with hunger, but I wasn’t in the headspace to feel “hungry.” I avoided turning my car off or on until I was sure nothing around me would catch fire, using my water bottle to keep my wash cloth moist. At two separate points, I saw people leave their vehicles, and so I shoved my cat into the box again and prepared to leave. Each of them returned, and nobody else behind or around me seemed interested in leaving. My cat returned to his hiding place stuffed tightly under the passenger seat. Several times I nearly left my vehicle with him, and only him. I finally received just a bit of signal, wherein I found 13 voice messages from my mother. I managed to contact her, my dad, and my brother, who advised me to use either the right side of Skyway or to go down Neil. I called my mother; she told me to be aggressive and resourceful and frequently shouted at me to leave, despite my not being able to. I assured her that I would get out of the car and ride with someone else if it came to that. I lost signal several times during these attempts. She called again and I phrased my situation incorrectly, telling her that I was ‘stuck’ in a traffic jam to which she responded with panicked shouts of, “Get out of there!” She wasn’t aware that I had made it through the worst, for the time being. I eventually got it across to her that I was not far from the fighters with several other stalled (likely more experienced) vehicles. She told me to meet at Ross in Chico before we lost signal again, as ACE was now burning with the rest of the town.
The fighters continued to cut off the flames and poise the shafts of water toward the center of the block. I saw another great wall of flames consuming the trees opposite the road in the distance, hoping that the firefighters acknowledged it. Several officers with radios patrolled the road. I was grateful for their help in that moment. For another long period we waited until we were directed up the road toward Wagstaff, the fighters aiming their hoses at our tires as we passed them. I was relieved to be moving again, though still very tense. I accidentally released my wiper fluid, spreading ashen muck across my wind shield, and had to drive from this point barely able to see (although this was not much different from the effect the air was having on visibility up to that point).
[4] Parking Lot
I followed several vehicles to the defensible, treeless parking lot of KMart on Clark and Wagstaff. I got out of my car after I was designated a section with other vehicles. I noticed a few people standing along the curb of the parking lot facing my bank, as my car was also facing outward toward Clark. They had a radio, but I never ended up asking for a status update, having overheard the extent of their knowledge through my window. I boxed my cat, phone, keys, and water, and took them to the officer directing us, requesting information, and being directed to stay in my vehicle. Having left my long, black scarf in the car, I sustained a few blisters from flying embers across my cheeks. I placed my cat back in my car, looked around, and got back inside. After a while, I noticed other cars were beginning to leave, and another officer told us that I had a choice to go down Clark, which was now cleared of debris, or remain there. I chose to leave after several other cars had already gone.
[5] Downhill
I made my way out by myself, and the world was still pitch black or glowing red. Sparks continued to fly across the street; I abandoned all driving laws save those that would directly affect my safety. I saw lights in the distance and speedily caught up to two other cars that were ahead of me; better to drive in a group and ensure that someone else leads the way. Nearing the edge of town, the vehicle ahead of me stopped fast. I did not hit the brake in time and mildly crumpled my license plate against his bumper, but his sustained no damage. Jack remained wedged between my seat and laundry basket full of clothes, his head completely buried, muffling his distressed meows. The vehicle ahead of me caught a telephone wire and we had to stop. An officer pulled up alongside us, perhaps to ensure that our group didn’t cause a blockade. After it was released, we dodged rocks as we moved toward Butte College. We passed two fire trucks on our way down, and I began to see more vehicles around us. There were no tears from me until this point, and even then, they were minimal.
[6] Out From Under
The sky was still dark but at this point nothing was burning. We passed two freed goats who headed in the direction the cars were headed; I considered taking them with me but realized that my car was too small, and that my cat might escape. We made our way into the light, somewhat out from under the canopy of smoke. The two vehicles ahead of me pulled over, and I emerged, shaking, asking the man from the vehicle ahead of me if I needed to exchange numbers, and being asked if I was okay and if I had a place to go. I was reassured that no damage was done, and that nothing was required. The lady in the frontmost vehicle took both of us in her arms and held us, sobbing, and declaring her relief at being free of that nightmare. They told me to follow them until I knew where I was going. I covered my face as I began to actually cry at that point. I got back in my car and continued to reassure my cat. I was not able to get to Chico to meet my family, as every exit from Oroville off of Clark/99 was closed, and so my mother met me at a Nazarine church evacuation center along the edge of the city by around 2:00pm. We met up with Darren and traveled together to a hotel my father secured, but upon helping me to rid my windshield of the muck, he found that my taillight and some of the metal around it had been melted. I was told that the fire spread so rapidly that a proper warning was not issued in time. On Edgewood, not a few streets behind where I was, I learned that five people had died in their vehicles. More deaths have been confirmed since then. Our house and left-behind belongings are gone. We’ve secured a rent-free fixer-upper home in Marysville for the next several months, and much financial and supplemental support from friends and loved ones has been provided. Everyone I know is safe.

 

 

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000 ($47,000 total so far in 2018)

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46 – Fire Relief For Rickard/Glick Family – “Camp Fire” Victims

Fire Relief for Rickard/Glick Fam

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Rachel, Jacob, and their two daughters, Alora (8) and Natoma (6), have been deeply affected by the Camp-Pulga Fire. They have spent the last five years cultivating a medicinal herb garden and farm using sustainable permaculture practices. Four years ago they planted 40 fruit trees and were just enjoying some of the first fruits, including persimmons, figs, and asian pears. Their two daughters, who they homeschool, spent their last days on the land running among the bright flowers, caring for the animals, and planting the fall beds.

Rachel co-founded the Elderberry Apothecary, which provides medicine made from her land to the community through many free, educational herbal workshops and events. She also teaches at two elementary aged homeschool programs in town. She has used her knowledge and work on her land to constantly give back to and help heal her community.

Jacob, a certified permaculture designer, has dedicated himself to rebuilding California’s land through regenerative food forest practices. He has been working in the community to help others bring the vision of sustainability to reality, while also being enrolled in Butte college as a biology major.

They were lucky to have time to grab some precious belongings as they were forced to evacuate, but that land has likely been lost, and they could only save so much. They are displaced, unable to continue their work and go to school, and lacking in basic supplies. The girls are sharing one car seat between them and are relying on the kindness of friends, family, and strangers. Please help support them through these devastating times with your donation here.

**We updated the goal to $30k.  Checks and paypal also accepted.   Whatever the outcome of the house,  the family will seek a new beginning. THANK YOU

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45 – Partnership For Drug-Free Kids

Partnership For Drug-Free Kids

Mission Statement

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Our Mission

At the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, we are committed to helping families struggling with their son’s or daughter’s substance use. We empower families with information, support and guidance to get the help their loved one needs and deserves. And we advocate for greater understanding and more effective programs to treat the disease of addiction.

How We Do It

  • We connect families with each other and with experts, working with them to get the help their loved one needs and deserves – a good place to start is with our Helpline.
  • We listen to families and provide a platform for them to share their stories of struggle and success – such as our Stories of Hope and Parent Blog.
  • We educate families about substance use and strategies they can use to help their loved one.
  • We empower parents to take early and effective action to address their son or daughter’s substance use, providing expert guidance and compassionate support.
  • We advocate for systemic change in the way our country addresses addiction, including universal evidence-based treatment options for families and their loved ones – like through those actions available via our Advocacy Center.

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44 – Placer Food Bank

Placer County Food Bank

The Face of Hunger

Hunger is an all but hidden epidemic in Placer Food Bank’s communities. Nearly 71,000 individuals in El Dorado, Nevada, and Placer Counties do not know where there next meal will come from.

More often than not, the hungry are hard-working adults, children and seniors who simply cannot make ends meet. Many are forced to choose between paying for rent, medicine, or transportation and buying food; missing daily meals or going without food for days.

Local Hunger Facts:

  • Hunger is a reality for 1 in 7 individuals living in El Dorado, Nevada, and Placer Counties
  • 1 in 5 of these individuals is a child
  • 30% of seniors in our region report having to choose between food and paying for medicine or medical care
  • 37% of the families receiving food from our network partners have one or more working adults in the household

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52 Mondays – What Its About

52 Mondays of Music – Quick Overview…

Here is a quick overview of what 52 Mondays is all about!

Posted by 52MondaysofMusic on Sunday, October 21, 2018

43 – The Salvation Army

Salvation Army of Northern California

Mission Statement

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church. Our message is based on the Bible, our ministry is motivated by the love of God, and our mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ as we meet human needs in His name without discrimination. Every program we offer is rooted in our passion to serve God by serving the lost, the vulnerable, the needy, the poor, the hurting, the helpless, and the hopeless.

 

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42 – Sacramento Steps Forward

Sacramento Steps Forward

Mission Statement

Sacramento Steps Forward manages the Sacramento City and County Homelessness Continuum of Care. We work to coordinate, develop and implement policies that address homelessness, with a focus on solutions that will improve system efficiency and reduce the number of individuals experiencing homelessness in our region. 

We work with homeless individuals, advocates, service providers, non-profits, faith-based communities, policymakers, elected officials, citizens, public agencies and businesses to work towards a common goal of ending homelessness.

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52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000 ($42,000 total so far in 2018)

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41 – Tony Conley – Go Fund Me

Tony Conley – Go Fund Me

I’ve been sick for some time, and it’s time to talk about what is going on with my health, and how it is affecting me and my family.

I have a fairly large tumor in my abdomen, and it has progressed to the point where I must now give all of my attention to my health and healing. I have been largely bedridden since mid-May, and maintaining any sort of appearance of normalcy has become impossible.

It’s hard to say exactly where and when it began, but it’s been probably about a year since I first noticed that everything was not quite right. It all began as a series of small things that I attributed to the stress and strain of daily life, but in May it became apparent that what I was dealing with was in no way normal.

I woke up on May 21 thinking I had the flu, I was achey, sweaty and feverish. As the day progressed I became very ill, and by days end I had lost several pints of blood. I remained extremely ill, and was totally incapacitated for almost seven weeks. Caring for myself was an impossibility, and I lost 35 pounds in a few short weeks. When I finally found the strength to place myself in front of a mirror, I was shocked to see the drastic changes that had occurred. I had already lost 30 pounds in the previous few months, but I had recently quit drinking, was eating less, and exercising more, so I did not realize that my weight loss was connected to a larger issue. Now, I had lost 65 pounds in less than a year, and quite frankly I resembled a wraith.

This all happened at the worst possible time, and the ensuing series of events would almost be laughable were they not so very real and tragic.

After five hard fought years since our son Ian’s birth, in which we’ve found ourselves working harder and harder for less and less in spite of our best efforts, we were shocked to find out that due to changes in the economy (it’s not a great market for everyone who’s not a banker or broker), we lost the house we had been living in for five years and were forced to seek other accommodations. We succeeded in finding an opportunity in Las Vegas that looked very promising. However, another set of completely unforeseeable circumstances arose that made this move an impossibility just days before we were to make the move, and in the same time period I was felled by this very aggressive attack on my body. I don’t believe that my wife and I had had ten days off together in the previous five years, but now things got really crazy.

For seven weeks, Monica had to perform at a super-human level. I required twenty-four hour care and was totally immobile. I could not walk, couldn’t feed myself, I could not even make my way to the bathroom. On top of this, she still had to care for Ian (a full-time job in itself), and on top of that she had to completely pack up our home in preparation for a move. It goes without saying that neither of us could work during this period, and between neither of us being able to generate any income and the considerable costs of medications and healthcare services, and moving costs, we’ve been completely wiped out financially.
After our Las Vegas adventure had been eliminated as a possibility, another situation arose that offered what looked like a grand opportunity, so we headed off towards the midwest with an SUV full of enough clothes and necessities, and several storage containers full of our life setting in Northern California waiting to see where we would land. Unfortunately, and again due to circumstances beyond anyone’s control and in spite of many people’s best efforts, this latest opportunity has been put on hold as I’ve become too ill to segue into being functional at a job at this time. I currently am in bed for about twenty hours a day, and I can only be on my feet for perhaps five to ten minutes before I am exhausted.

You’d think a little growth in my belly couldn’t cause such a stir, but here is the score card of areas that it has effected:

I’ve lost 65 pounds and a great deal of muscle mass
Bladder failure
Kidney pain and bleeding (several hemorrhages that occurred in May)
Intestines – constant constipation due to impingement
Circulation & lungs (greatly reduced endurance and capacity)
Edema/leg pain
Constantly cold and aching extremities to the point in which typing or even strumming a guitar are impossibilities
Persistent headaches and lack of ability to concentrate
Substantial depression and suicidal ideation

On the good side, my weight has stabilized, most of my blood tests reflect strong function and systemic stability, but I have a ways to go before I will be up and running in a sustainable fashion.

On the rough side, I am having a terrible time maintaining my regimen for shrinking this damned tumor.

When we lived in California, I was having great success with both pain management and controlling the size and temperament of the tumor via THC and CBD oil. However, now we are in Ohio, where cannabis is still illegal and even if it weren’t, we can no longer afford its costs, along with the acupuncturist, the herbalist, and other health care services which fall outside of the allopathic viewpoint. I cannot state strongly enough how important and vital cannabis products have been to dealing with my illness, and not having them available has been fairly disastrous. My stress has tremendously increased and my physical condition has worsened directly as a result. I am often in such pain that I cannot sleep for 24-36 hours at a time, and I rarely take over-the-counter pain meds which are so hazardous to my already weakened kidneys and bladder, and I staunchly refuse to consider big Pharma pain meds which will render me an addict. THC and CBD have been major components of my healing and effort to control the progression of this illness, and their absence is the true crime here.

Today, I feel pretty good, relatively speaking, but the hellhounds are truly upon us.

Since leaving Sacramento in early July, we have been leading the life of refugees. We have done well, and while we have covered our costs and not acquired any new debt, but we are now totally broke. We have less than $200 left in the bank, and no sign as to when we will again see any revenue. There is no money for medicines, services, or anything else for that matter. I have applied for help from the state of Ohio, but their interest in helping people is minimal at best, though having access to a doctor will soon be available, so there is that if it becomes essential. Up to now we have been treating this very holistically and organically, but the means with which to do this have now been depleted.

To my best reckoning, if I keep doing what I am doing, I will be healthy enough to return to work in 90-120 days, and if I’m really lucky, by then some potential opportunities will come to fruition, but the questions remains both as to how we can bridge this gap, and if these opportunities do come to pass.

My family and I have been gifted with having some great relatives, friends, and acquaintances who have helped us tremendously over the last several months, and we have been able to keep our heads above water and a roof over our head, but the water continues to rise, and we are continuing to sink.

Where this leads, I cannot say, but I have been fielding a lot of questions about my health and what is going on with our family, so I thought it time to say something publicly about our situation.

 

 

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40 – Dylan Sudtell – Go Fund Me

Dylan Sudtell – Family Go Fund Me Page

Our family has suffered a great loss of a wonderful fiancé, father, son, brother and friend. His life was cut short Monday night from a tragic motorcycle accident. Dylan was a man that had a great enthusiasm for life and loved to live his life to the fullest. He had a great big heart and the people in his life he loved wholeheartedly. He was the sole supporter of the two biggest people in his life, his fiancé Emily and his sweet baby boy Henry. I know he loved them two with all of his heart and wanted his baby boy to have the best possible life. Emily and Henry can really use all the support they can get at this time. Any donations are greatly appreciated.Dylan, we love you and will be greatly missed. Please know we will take care of your family.

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52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000 ($40,000 total so far in 2018)

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39 – American Red Cross

American Red Cross

Mission Statement

Each day, thousands of people – people just like you – provide compassionate care to those in need. Our network of generous donors, volunteers and employees share a mission of preventing and relieving suffering, here at home and around the world.

We roll up our sleeves and donate time, money and blood. We learn or teach life-saving skills so our communities can be better prepared when the need arises. We do this every day because the Red Cross is needed – every day.

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000 ($39,000 total so far in 2018)

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38 – Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Mission Statement

The mission of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is to cure cystic fibrosis and to provide all people with the disease the opportunity to lead full, productive lives by funding research and drug development, promoting individualized treatment, and ensuring access to high-quality, specialized care.

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000 ($38,000 total so far in 2018)

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37 – Elk Grove Foodbank Services

ELK GROVE FOOD BANK SERVICES

Mission Statement

“Providing essential resources to overcome the many faces of hunger and human need”

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000 ($37,000 total so far in 2018)

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35 – Relay For Life – American Cancer Society

Relay For Life – American Cancer Society

Mission Statement

Relay For Life is the signature fundraiser cancer walk for the American Cancer Society. Relay is staffed and coordinated by volunteers in more than 5,200 communities and 20 countries who give of their time and effort because they believe it’s time to take action against cancer

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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34 – Active 20 / 30 Club Of Sacramento

Active 20 – 30 Club Of Sacramento

Mission Statement

Active 20-30 is a non-profit organization that provides women between the ages of 20 and 39 with an opportunity for personal growth, friendships and leadership development while improving the quality of life for the special needs of children in our communities.

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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33 – Ronald McDonald House Of Northern California

Ronald McDonald House Of Northern California

Mission Statement

Ronald McDonald House Charities Northern California

Dedicated to supporting programs that improve the lives of children and their families.

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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32 – California Fire Foundation

California Fire Foundation

Mission Statement

Providing emotional and financial assistance to families of fallen firefighters, firefighters and the communities they protect.

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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31 – Triumph Cancer Foundation

Triumph Cancer Foundation

Mission Statement

The mission of the Triumph Cancer Foundation is empowering cancer survivors to recapture their lives after cancer treatment through physical fitness. Our signature program, Triumph Fitness, offers adult cancer survivors an opportunity to regain their strength and stamina in a safe environment with exercise specialists specifically trained to work with cancer survivors…

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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30 – Twin Lakes Food Bank

Twin Lakes Food Bank

Mission Statement

The mission of the Twin Lakes Food Bank is to share God’s love by mobilizing the community to provide food  and support to those in need.

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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29 – Boys & Girls Club Of Sacramento

Boys & Girls Club Of Sacramenot

Mission Statement

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Sacramento is a place where kids can feel safe, connect with others, and build the skills and confidence needed to reach GREAT FUTURES. We see the potential in every kid and teen, and we are here to help them fulfill their potential and become who they were meant to be.

 

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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01 – River City Food Bank

River City Food Bank

Mission Statement

As Sacramento’s oldest, continuously-serving food bank, our mission is to alleviate hunger in Sacramento County by providing healthy emergency food and other assistance, offering referrals and promoting self-sufficiency through a variety of programs.  From seniors to children, from the homeless to the working poor, we assist all struggling individuals and families in Sacramento County.

52 Mondays of Music has donated $1,000

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